Social Action Fund awards grant to inspire philanthropy in young people

first_img The Government’s Social Action Fund has awarded £303,800 to The Youth and Philanthropy Initiative (YPI) to raise awareness of philanthropy among young people in England. The project currently works with 10,000 young people, developing skills through hands-on experience of philanthropy and providing them with ‘real life’ experiences of charitable giving.The project involves working with school pupils who, as a team, select a local charity that best addresses their chosen issue. They interview staff and beneficiaries before preparing a presentation for a judging panel with the best team winning a £3,000 donation for their charity.The new funding from the Social Action Fund will enable the London-based project to expand to the Midlands and North West, enabling a total of 18,000 pupils to participate.Nick Hurd, the Minister for Civil Society, said: “The money we have awarded through the Social Action Fund means this hugely successful initiative can extend its reach beyond London enabling more young people to support local good causes. It will broaden young people’s horizons, empower them to address community issues and gives them real opportunities to develop their teamwork and presentation skills. Head teachers across the country should embrace this programme.”www.thesocialinvestmentbusiness.org/our-funds/social-action-fund/winners/ Howard Lake | 15 June 2012 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Funding Giving/Philanthropy Social Action Fund awards grant to inspire philanthropy in young people  56 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Virgin Money Foundation opens first grants round

first_imgVirgin Money Foundation opens first grants round Tagged with: Funding North East Howard Lake | 14 August 2015 | News The Virgin Money Foundation has announced its first round of funding, which is open to organisations that achieve long term impact in communities in the North East of England.The funding will be for organisations that:• enable homeless people or people at risk of homelessness to find a home, especially through increasing the supply of affordable rented properties.• provide opportunities for youth education, training and enterprise.• create and support community and social enterprise.• fund feasibility studies into larger capital projects that will bring people and money into a deprived community.Applications are invited for funding from £10,000 to £50,000 from organisations working in  the local authority areas of Darlington, Durham, Gateshead, Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Newcastle upon Tyne, North Tyneside, Northumberland, Redcar and Cleveland, South Tyneside, Stockton on Tees, and Sunderland.Grants are for running costs, not capital costs. They are for one year only.The closing date for applications to the Virgin Money Foundation’s first funding round is 28 September 2015.The Foundation, the creation of which was announced last year, will subsequently extend its funding activities across the UK.“Not enough” says Labour MPThe North East of England was where the Northern Rock Foundation was active before it closed. Virgin Money took over the Northern Rock bank following its nationalisation in 2012 following the financial crisis of 2008.Chi Onwurah, Labour MP for Newcastle Upon Tyne, criticised the amount being provided by Virgin Money Foundation, contrasting it with the work of the Northern Rock Foundation. She said:“Before it got caught up in the consequences of casino type financial speculation, Northern Rock reflected the values of the North East by generously investing in local good causes. I would like to see Virgin Money do the same.” Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Liz Tait joins Institute of Fundraising’s board of trustees

first_img Liz Tait, Director of Fundraising at Battersea Dogs & Cats Home, has joined the board of trustees of the Institute of Fundraising.A fundraiser for more than 16 years, she has lead the fundraising strategy and team at Battersea since 2010. She and her team cover public fundraising, major donors, corporates, trusts, legacy marketing, community fundraising and events.She has been co-opted to the IoF Board to replace Tanya Steele, who has stepped down after taking on a growing global remit at Save the Children.She is already a fellow of the Institute of Fundraising and a member of its Learning and Development Committee. She is also chair of the Fundraising Convention Board, which runs the annual National Fundraising Convention, the largest event for fundraisers in Europe.Liz Tait and Lollipop at Battersea Dogs & Cats Home AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Institute of Fundraising Recruitment / people trustees Liz Tait joins Institute of Fundraising’s board of trustees  55 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tait said:“I’m passionate about what fundraisers can deliver for great causes and am committed to the development of our sector. So it’s a privilege to become a trustee of the Institute of Fundraising at such a pivotal time for the fundraising profession. I’m very much looking forward to working with the Board and team at the IoF.”In her five years at Battersea, Tait’s team have increased non-legacy fundraising income from £1.6m to more than £20m. They have also won Fundraising Team of the Year from Charity Times in 2012 and Third Sector in 2013 and 2015.Before Battersea, Tait was Head of Direct Marketing at the British Red Cross, and helped transform the charity’s direct marketing income, which rose from £27m in 2007 to £57m in 2010.Richard Taylor, Chair of the Institute of Fundraising, welcomed Tait’s appointment, saying: Advertisement Howard Lake | 12 January 2016 | News “I am delighted that another of the UK’s finest fundraisers has agreed to join the IoF’s board of trustees. Liz brings with her a wealth of experience from across our sector and has served our community well through Fundraising Convention Board.“I would also like to thank Tanya Steele for her commitment and her exceptional chairing of our Standards Committee, and wish her well with her new responsibilities at Save the Children.” About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Tesco invites round-up donations at the till for two charities

first_img Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 11 September 2017 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis54 Tagged with: charity of the year corporate microdonations For the next month staff at supermarket Tesco are asking shoppers to round up their payment at the till with a few extra pennies as a donation for Diabetes UK and the British Heart Foundation.The rounding-up option, which has been offered by other charities such as Sainsbury’s for Red Nose Day, neatly complements the supermarket’s strapline of “every little counts”.The Great Tesco WalkTesco has introduced the option as a way to enable shoppers to support The Great Tesco Walk.The walk will see thousands of Tesco staff join together to walk in relay between 5 September and 5 October, with the aim of adding to the £21 million already raised since Tesco’s current charity partnership began in 2015.The donation ask is being made at all tills, and at self-service tills, until 5 October, the end of the walk.The round-up campaign follows recent criticism of Tesco’s retention of £3.4 million to administer the £31.9 million raised by the supermarket’s plastic bag levy donation scheme. Tesco has recently confirmed it is scrapping its 5p per bag charge and offering 10p bags for life instead.Fiona Cincotta, a senior market analyst at City Index, said of the rounding-up campaign: “This technique is a great way for customers to be able to donate to charity in an affordable way. It’s a great way to reinforce Tesco’s brand message of “every penny counts” and that’s exactly what charities need. This is another great follow on from their plastic bag policy which is to benefit local community projects. Tesco are really upping their CSR with this move and I think it’s something that consumers will back heavily”.WATCH: The Great Tesco Walk[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ocuhz9U2BeY[/youtube]  343 total views,  1 views today  344 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis54 Tesco invites round-up donations at the till for two charitieslast_img read more

Tough Mudder enters administration

first_img  681 total views,  2 views today Tagged with: Events Finance About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis12 Melanie May | 5 February 2020 | News Tough Mudder has gone into administration, with a view to selling the business and assets, including its wholly owned subsidiary, Tough Mudder GmbH, as a going concern.According to a statement on its website, Michael Solomons and Andrew Pear of BM Advisory LLP were appointed as Joint Administrators of Tough Mudder Ltd on 24 January 2020. The Administrators are continuing to trade the business and all currently scheduled 2020 events in the UK and Germany are currently still going ahead. The US and Canadian events however are subject to the outcome of court proceedings in those countries.Tickets already purchased for 2020 events remain valid, and those purchased during the Administration trading period will be subject to Tough Mudder’s refund policy if a scheduled event is cancelled.The Administrators will be writing to all known creditors to formally advise them of the appointment, and to provide the necessary appointment documentation.2020 is the 10th anniversary of Tough Mudder and there are a number of events scheduled for this year in the UK, with the next one due to take place on 17 and 18 April at London’s Finsbury Park. Tough Mudder offers a range of challenges, from 5k to 24 hours, and has held over 355 since 2010, with more than 4 million participants. Participants can also choose to run for charity. Last year was the fifth anniversary of Tough Mudder’s partnership with Help for Heroes for which it has raised over £3million, with other charities also promoted on its site, which vary depending on the region.  682 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis12 Tough Mudder enters administrationlast_img read more

Bosses ‘fire’ 300 Local 10 members in Oakland after tentative agreement at West Coast ports

first_imgUnloaded ships.News broke on Feb. 20 that an agreement between the Pacific Maritime Association — the organization of the West Coast port bosses — and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union would allow full-time work to unload a two-month backup of shipping pending a ratification vote of the union. The PMA had imposed mini lockouts for the past months on the union in an attempt to win a contract that left workers at a disadvantage. But the battle is still on.In Oakland, Calif., once again the bosses caused critically backed-up port work to stop, forcing 300 workers — everyone working that shift — to go home for the day on Feb. 22, while blaming ILWU Local 10 members for the stoppage.To find out the truth about what was happening in Oakland — which processes 10 percent of the $2 trillion in goods loaded and unloaded on the West Coast each year — Workers World spoke with Trent Willis, former president and business agent of Local 10 with 22 years experience on the docks. Willis is also the originator of the 2004 Million Worker March in Washington, D.C.Willis made it very clear that ILWU members did not walk off the job on Feb. 22, as was widely reported; in fact, they were “fired” by the Pacific Maritime Association. ILWU Local 10 has a well-earned reputation as a progressive local that has played an important role in political struggles such as the historic battle to end apartheid in South Africa.Despite a tentative agreement announced Feb. 20, the PMA sacrificed fully three-fourths of Sunday production in Oakland when it “fired” all day shift longshore workers — including Willis. Instead of calling out the PMA for stopping work, an area arbitrator that Willis identified as Terry Lane did just the opposite: He immediately approved the bosses’ action.Lane, who was formerly a vice-president of the Pacific Maritime Association, is notorious for his pro-boss decisions. He is due to be replaced as an arbitrator in the proposed contract.KTVU reported, “In a statement the Pacific Maritime Association said ‘an area arbitrator’ ruled the unit breaks, ‘illegal work stoppages,’ resulting in port operations being shut down’ during the day shift.” (tinyurl.com/nec8cnq)Willis explained that Local 10 members also attempted to get back to work after the tentative agreement. “We were told over the radio that if we took a unit break we would all be fired,” explained Willis, “even though that’s what it says to do in our contract.”The PMA wants the workers to take their break one at a time, what it calls “tag relief.” But according to the contract, to assure continuous operation during breaks, the PMA must request additional workers to be on hand. According to Willis, it was these additional workers who were sent home first, leaving the workers with a unit break as the only reasonable option that honored the contract.‘Firing’ tactic caused shipping crisisThe most recent contract expired last July 1. After stonewalling negotiations with the ILWU, the PMA began this “firing” tactic last fall, according to rank-and-file ILWU members. The bosses then blamed port workers for the shipping crisis affecting everything from auto parts and agriculture to Mardi Gras beads. Thus, the PMA created the shipping crisis, first by not negotiating a contract with the ILWU before the expiration date, then “firing” crews and finally by ending night shifts, along with weekend and holiday work, for which workers get higher hourly pay.Willis further explained that the way the PMA used the area arbitrator — Lane — in the Feb. 22 conflict at Oakland also violated past practice. Contractually, when there is a dispute on the job, the PMA and ILWU representatives come to the site and attempt to settle the issue. If it is unresolved after this attempt, only then is the area arbitrator called for a ruling, based on the written contract. Either side can then appeal that ruling to the coast arbitrator responsible for all West Coast ports, who makes a final decision. On Feb. 22, the arbitrator ruled after workers were sent home.The necessity for impartial area arbitrators was a major issue in these contract negotiations because Lane and other arbitrators took it upon themselves to unilaterally rewrite the agreed upon contract language in favor of the PMA, even on important health and safety issues.The tentative agreement announced Feb. 20 after intervention by Obama administration Labor Secretary Tom Perez has not yet been discussed or ratified by the ILWU’s 13,000 members at 29 West Coast ports.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Fighting gentrification in New York City

first_imgImani HenryThe following is adapted from a WW interview with Imani Henry, of Equality for Flatbush, on the struggle against gentrification in Brooklyn, N.Y.Brooklyn is definitely ground zero for gentrification in New York City. Gentrification is a global issue. My hometown of Boston is now considered the most gentrified city with the highest rents in the country. San Francisco has priced and pushed out Black, Latino and Latina, and Asian folks for close to a decade. Oakland has a fierce battle with gentrification raging. So does L.A. The bottom line is that Brooklyn is not alone. Many cities are being devastated by rampant gentrification.Specific to Brooklyn is that rents have gone up by outrageous degrees in neighborhoods where the average median income is under $35,000 a year. People in largely migrant neighborhoods are being priced and pushed out by the thousands. The New York Times reported a 400 percent increase in foreclosures. Many white folks who don’t know Bedford-Stuyvesant’s long history as a center of Black culture and revolutionary politics are moving in.Increased tenant, police harassment We see increased tenant harassment in Brooklyn — everything from landlords denying people gas for 3 to 18 months, to getting checks and then taking people to court for nonpayment, to using people’s immigration, racial or gender status against them.We’re currently fighting a landlord who refuses to make repairs for long-term tenants in order to force them out — and then overcharges new tenants. If you just moved to Brooklyn in the last five years and you’re in a rent-stabilized apartment, chances are you’re being overcharged $300 to $400.Tenant harassment is coupled with police harassment. We’ve been able to prove that since 2012, rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods have had high rates of “stop and frisk” profiling. “Broken window” policing has meant summonses for everything from riding bikes on the sidewalk, walking between subway cars, speeding on a platform and being in a park after dusk.“Driving while Black or Brown.” We do so much work trying to stop the level of tickets and summonses written to drivers of color. A checkpoint is set up and a quota set. We have captured video showing harassment of young people. We’ve also documented plenty of white people drinking or smoking on the subway without getting any tickets. There is clearly a double standard for people of color and migrants moving in or trying to live or stay in Brooklyn. Landlords refuse to rent or sell to people of color, and at the same time the police are doing everything in their power to push people out of Brooklyn. We’re back to Jim Crow segregation in New York City.Imani Henry assulted at Mayor’s hearing.On March 23, the mayor’s housing plan was approved by the City Council. This plan leaves out a large percentage of the people of New York, especially families of color who can no longer afford to live in the city. Some 25 percent of the people here make $25,000 and under a year. Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan specifically allows rezoning of peoples and communities. We are sitting in our neighborhoods thinking to ourselves: “We want more skyscrapers? That’s what New York City needs? We need more luxury apartments?” Only a small percentage of housing goes toward low-income units. In our own neighborhoods we are considered minorities.People who can afford market-rate apartments become the majority in a building. That is ridiculous. The vast majority of the people who live in New York City are low- to middle-income. We should have the majority of the housing.The housing crisis means that 80 percent of the people spend all their money and resources on paying rent. It is time to have rent regulation universally in New York. The vast majority of people live in unregulated housing, and we should turn that around. We don’t need new condos and luxury developments. What we need is real affordable housing for everyone. We’re seeing people new to New York City who don’t know their rights and don’t know they’re in a rent-stabilized apartment. They’ve been told lies like “You’re getting preferential rent,” so they think they’re getting a deal. But the truth of the matter is that the landlord is ready to jack up the rent on them at any time. Part of rent stabilization is having a lease with succession rights and repairs that are covered by the landlord. When you’re an unregulated tenant, you’re at the mercy of your landlord. People with big apartments whose rent is low because they have a lease and have been there for 30 years are being taken to landlord-tenant court. Sometimes they are elders in hospice care who have younger relatives living with them to take care of their dying loved ones.Developers and the de Blasio administrationAt the end of the day the de Blasio administration is beholden to the developers. Capitalism is about profit. Progressive journalist Aaron Cantu has written about the developers behind de Blasio’s pro-gentrification housing plan. Our community boards must be elected and have veto power because the borough president, who is in many cases tied to real estate money, appoints a community board that then is beholden to him and not to the community. The developers then come to our neighborhoods and get licenses to build. The mayor has made it easier for them to rezone our neighborhoods.The Equality for Flatbush campaign is partnered with large, affordable housing tenant groups and small grass-roots groups. More protests are being planned. We will be launching a campaign demanding elected community boards. Groups are bringing lawsuits against community boards and the city administration for their role in tenant harassment and discrimination. We must turn the tide around and make sure that tenants, homeowners, small businesses, people of color, migrants, LGBTQ people, elders, people living with AIDS, disabled people and victims of domestic abuse — all can stay in their homes.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Moorehead campaigns in Michigan

first_imgMonica Moorehead, Workers World Party’s candidate for president, spoke to a packed hall at the Detroit WWP headquarters on Sept. 10.Joe Mchahwar began the discussion by explaining how the war in Syria is the epicenter of today’s global class conflict. He reminded us that as imperialist world powers, led by the U.S., seek to overthrow the Assad government and dominate Syria, we must uphold the Syrian people’s right to self-determination without intervention from foreign governments holding only capitalist interests.Abayomi Azikiwe honored the 45-year anniversary of the Attica prison uprising, recapping the past 60 years of African-American successes and struggles against the racist and sexist global capitalist system. He explained the significance of the 1971 murder in San Quentin Prison of Black Panther Field Marshal George Jackson and presented examples of Jackson’s insightful writings.Moorehead concluded the discussion, explaining that whether Trump or Clinton wins in the November election, it will not be a win for the working class. A Trump or Clinton victory won’t make much of a difference because the ruling capitalist class and police state will continue functioning as they always have been. As long as the racist and sexist capitalist system is still at play, people of color, women and the LGBTQ community will remain oppressed and marginalized. She reminded us that the only way to dismantle the oppressive system is by awakening others to their own class consciousness and the power of solidarity with all oppressed peoples.The day before, Moorehead and a group of Michigan supporters went to Lansing, the state capital, and submitted paperwork for Moorehead and her running mate, Lamont Lilly, to be official write-in candidates in Michigan. The application included a list of electors representing every congressional district in the state.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Sparked by Kaepernick – Sports protests pummel racism

first_imgEli Harold, Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid, Oct. 2.Colin Kaepernick’s lone action condemning police brutality against Black people has multiplied into the most widespread mass protest against racism in U.S. sports history.Kaepernick, a San Francisco 49ers quarterback, has refused to stand for the game day national anthem since Aug. 10. Since then, 59 National Football League players from 13 teams have knelt, lifted a fist or sat down during the anthem. On three teams, all the players, of all nationalities, have either linked arms or held hands to show unity.Florida State University students sit during national anthem, Oct. 8.By Oct. 7, resistance had sprung up swiftly in other sports and related activities, including soccer, volleyball, swimming, cheerleading and band performances. Fourteen Women’s National Basketball Association players from three teams protested during their playoffs.Eight men’s National Basketball Association teams, including the world famous Los Angeles Lakers, locked arms in protest. Lakers center Tarik Black said, “There needs to be equality.”Anthem protests have occurred in at least 44 high schools, 21 colleges and two youth leagues in 34 states in the U.S. and three nations abroad.According to a Guardian database, U.S. police have killed 156 people since Kaepernick’s protest began. Between 20 to 25 percent of these were Black, a number far exceeding the proportion of Black people in the U.S. population.East Carolina State band members kneel during national anthem. Greenville, N.C., Oct. 1.Racist reaction to the protests has been horrific, so the bravery of those continuing to act must be acknowledged. On Oct. 1, at a game against the University of North Carolina, 19 East Carolina University band members knelt as the national anthem was played. They were booed, spat on and had bottles thrown at them. The school threatened to rescind their scholarships, and a faculty member said she’d bring her gun to school to exercise her “constitutional rights.”The ECU student government came to the band members’ support. A hundred students, Black and white, gathered for the Black Student Union’s die-in, complete with Black Power salutes, at the center of campus.Students refuse to stand during national anthem at first-ranked University of Alabama football game. Tuscaloosa, Oct. 1.Right-wingers are jeering, “Keep politics out of sports.” But many athletes, coaches and even referees have given forceful accounts of being subjected to racist profiling, having guns pulled on them by cops, or losing family and friends to cop killings. Guard DeMar DeRozan of the Toronto Raptors basketball team has related how a close friend was killed by police recently — shot 17 times.Big money interests are trying to enforce allegiance to status quo racist “America” as a “condition of employment” on students earning scholarship money through athletic or band performance or on more mature athletes who are formally workers for their “owners.”Kieran Shanahan, vice chair of ECU trustees, who is leading athletic boosters in a $55 million fund drive, said the band members’ protest was as unacceptable as a student making a political statement in a classroom. Not grasping the concept of academic freedom any better than constitutional freedom of speech, Shanahan also disclosed his bedrock belief that working students were in an “employ at will” status to the university’s big business trustees.Seattle Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin recently revealed that at least one owner of an NFL team has strictly forbidden players on “his” team to protest. In an interview with HBO’s “Any Given Wednesday,” Baldwin said the owner told players, “You’re going to stand on the line with your hand on your heart and you’re going to sing the national anthem because this is my stage.” There is no Black owner of an NFL team.Corporate media blame the protests for an almost 20 percent decline in NFL viewing ratings this season. Savvy insiders are saying the decline is due to the stranglehold that NFL business heads exert over all aspects of the sport to try to maximize profits.The widespread protests break with the myth that U.S. “democracy” offers “equal rights for all.” To prop up fading working-class allegiance to dead-end capitalism in the U.S., the Department of Defense has paid millions for pregame and halftime propaganda at sports events. DOD gave money for huge flags and military honor guards, marching bands and flyovers to 18 NFL teams, eight NBA teams and six NHL teams. The Buffalo Bills received $650,000, while their coach Rex Ryan spouts support for racist, woman-hating Donald Trump.New York Knicks center Joakim Noah highlighted the connection between U.S. racism and U.S. imperialism in his recent decision not to attend a team dinner at West Point, the U.S. Military Academy, because of his anti-war stance. Noah is on record as supporting Kaepernick’s anti-racist resistance. (New York Times, Sept. 30)Meanwhile, the protests roll on. As first-ranked University of Alabama played Kentucky on Oct. 1, about 30 students stuck to their seats in opposition as the anthem played. Alabama has won four of the last seven national college football championships, and protesters faced down over 100,000 fanatic fans in Denny Stadium. In an interview with Crimson White, the UA student newspaper, junior Dwyer Freeman said the action was in solidarity with those “harmed under the flag that’s supposed to represent them.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Buffalo celebrates Indigenous Peoples Day and protests billionaire school board member’s sexism

first_imgRally shouts “HELL NO, Carl Paladino! Sexism and Racism is NOT ‘normal’ at the Buffalo School Board, Oct. 12.People from many Buffalo, N.Y., organizations and communities gathered on Oct. 10 to call for replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day. They also demanded an end to the Dakota Access Pipeline and rallied in solidarity with the resistance at Standing Rock, N.D.People then demonstrated at the Buffalo School Board meeting on Oct. 12 against local millionaire developer and school board member Carl Paladino. Not for the first time Paladino had rushed to defend Donald Trump, this time declaring that Trump’s sexist behavior and language are something that “all men do, at least all normal men.” Community activists immediately came together to reject Paladino, and to say that his openly racist and sexist record has made it clear that he is unfit to be on the school board. Paladino was met with signs, chants and a large crowd determined to be heard rejecting his bigotry.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more